HOW TO MAKE BETTER BEVERAGES PHOTOS?

Blog by: Sayoni Walujkar

Beverage photography seems like a simple subject but there is a lot to it. It's an art and there are a lot of things that you can do to get the perfect shot. Beverage photography, or alcohol photography as it is also commonly referred to, has created a niche for itself in the photography industry, and has spawned a number of influential photographers in the process. If you are planning on shooting beverages, here are a few tips that will help you get the right shot.

USE THE RULE OF ODDS

The rule states that when you're including subjects in your photo, an odd number, rather than an even number will produce a more interesting composition. By having an odd number of subjects in your photo, you can more easily highlight one as the main subject by placing it in a powerful place in your composition and using a lower aperture to really help it stand out.

USE COMPLEMENTARY COLOURS

Using complementary colours is a great way to add interest and vibrance to your photos. So whatever the main colour of your drink is, try incorporating a complementary colour in your garnishes and/or props.

TRY BACKLIGHTING YOUR SUBJECT

This tip will not work for all drink shoots, but a great way to light your drinks, especially if they are a clearer liquid, is to light them from behind. This can give drinks a lovely glow and helps with the pesky reflections you can get when shooting drinks.

CLEAN YOUR GLASS AND USE GLOVES 

This one may not seem important in theory, but it's really easy to just assume a glass is clean if you take it out of your cabinet. To save you a lot of time editing out in Photoshop, give your glasses a good clean with a microfiber or lint-free cloth beforehand.

Beverage photography is much more than taking pictures of drinks in a studio. These are the different techniques you can use to create a real-life feel and create professional results. We hope this guide has helped you understand how you can take your beverage photography to the next level!

Blog by: Sayoni Walujkar